DTC Era

DTC startups are designing loyalty programs to focus on more than just sales

As the pandemic continues to upend the ways people shop, direct-to-consumer startups are continuously looking for creative ways to reward customers through the launch of new loyalty programs. Handbag brand Dagne Dover launched its first-ever loyalty program last week, through which customers can earn points not only for buying product, but also for writing a review, or following the company on social media. Hair care startup Prose also launched its first ever membership program over the summer, incorporating perks like access to one-on-one virtual consultations and a wellness podcast. It's a trend that started before the pandemic, but now it's more important than ever that companies find ways to reward their loyal customers, even if they're not able to buy product right now.

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  • JAN 26, 2021
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  • JAN 26, 2021

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  • JAN 22, 2021

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  • JAN 15, 2021

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  • JAN 14, 2021

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  • JAN 08, 2021

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  • SEP 13, 2021
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    Back to school 2021: What happened and what it means moving forward

    Watch this on-demand webinar where experts discuss the changes to the back-to-school season and what it means for retailers now and in the future.

Modern Retail Summit
Oct 12–Oct 14, 2021

At the Modern Retail Summit, retail executives will come together to discuss effective strategies for driving sales by building a loyal customer base both online and offline.

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